Acupuncture and Seasonal Affect Disorder (SAD)

March 2, 2017 - Leave a Response

Dr. Diane Ferris

During the winter, the days are shorter and in some regions the sun doesn’t shine for days. Many suffer from Seasonal Affect Disorder (SAD) during this time. SAD tends to affect women more than men and has various symptoms which may include increase moodiness and fatigue. Acupuncture can offer relief from the imbalances that occur during this time of the year.

Traditional Chinese medicine teaches us that balance is necessary for our well being and health. For optimal harmony we need a balance of Yin and Yang. Yin represents cold, quiet, evening, moon, earth, and female. Yang represents hot, activity, day, heaven and male. The yin season is winter and the yang season is summer. Day turns into evening and winter gradually leads to summer.  In our environment we see the transformation of yin into yang and vice versa.

Winter can be a season for reflection and introspection. It can prepare us for growth and the renewal of spring. The yin nature of…

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Acupuncture and Seasonal Affect Disorder (SAD)

February 1, 2017 - Leave a Response

During the winter, the days are shorter and in some regions the sun doesn’t shine for days. Many suffer from Seasonal Affect Disorder (SAD) during this time. SAD tends to affect women more than men and has various symptoms which may include increase moodiness and fatigue. Acupuncture can offer relief from the imbalances that occur during this time of the year.

Traditional Chinese medicine teaches us that balance is necessary for our well being and health. For optimal harmony we need a balance of Yin and Yang. Yin represents cold, quiet, evening, moon, earth, and female. Yang represents hot, activity, day, heaven and male. The yin season is winter and the yang season is summer. Day turns into evening and winter gradually leads to summer.  In our environment we see the transformation of yin into yang and vice versa.

Winter can be a season for reflection and introspection. It can prepare us for growth and the renewal of spring. The yin nature of winter combined with an individual’s own yin nature may cause a deficiency of yang. This person may feel fatigue, cold and withdrawn. Given the differences between yin, being more female, and yang, being more male,  it makes sense in a yin/yang model,  why women suffer more from SAD than men. Careful restoration of balance that acupuncture can offer may help restore an individual. It can be used as a powerful treatment to combat SAD.

 

 

 

 

 

Acupuncture and Seasonal Affect Disorder (SAD)

January 31, 2017 - One Response

During the winter, the days are shorter and in some regions the sun doesn’t shine for days. Many suffer from Seasonal Affect Disorder (SAD) during this time. SAD tends to affect women more than men and has various symptoms which may include increase moodiness and fatigue. Acupuncture can offer relief from the imbalances that occur during this time of the year.

Traditional Chinese medicine teaches us that balance is necessary for our well being and health. For optimal harmony we need a balance of Yin and Yang. Yin represents cold, quiet, evening, moon, earth, and female. Yang represents hot, activity, day, heaven and male. The yin season is winter and the yang season is summer. Day turns into evening and winter gradually leads to summer.  In our environment we see the transformation of yin into yang and vice versa.

Winter can be a season for reflection and introspection. It can prepare us for growth and the renewal of spring. The yin nature of winter combined with an individual’s own yin nature may cause a deficiency of yang. This person may feel fatigue, cold and withdrawn. Given the differences between yin, being more female, and yang, being more male,  it makes sense in a yin/yang model,  why women suffer more from SAD than men. Careful restoration of balance that acupuncture can offer may help restore an individual. It can be used as a powerful treatment to combat SAD.

 

 

 

 

 

Acupuncture- Why it Works

February 25, 2016 - Leave a Response

I’m glad to see there are more positive articles about acupuncture. I think one of the most difficult questions to answer is, why and how.  I often ask my patients which perspective do they want to hear. Do you want an Eastern perspective or a Western perspective?

Many westerners view acupuncture as a myth or faith healing. They think only standard western medicine has the answer for all diseases and anything else is nonsense. Acupuncture was created over two thousand years, it was developed with critical thinking, careful observation and testing. The human body is mapped throughout from head to toe, front and back, internally, externally  with meridians. Each meridian corresponds to an organ system. These organ systems are inter related.

Diseases can be caused by “heat”, “dampness”, “wind”, and other elements not traditionally used by westerners to describe illness. Western medicine focuses on the symptom and relates the disease to the symptom. Whereas Eastern medicine looks at the affect of the disease and relates it to the whole being. Treatment is dependent on restoration of balance and bringing the body back to harmony.

 

 

Acupuncture and Fibromyalgia

February 18, 2016 - Leave a Response

Source: Acupuncture and Fibromyalgia

Acupuncture and Fibromyalgia

February 17, 2016 - 2 Responses

I ran across this article today published in Medical News and was very excited to see a study using acupuncture to treat fibromyalgia.  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/306569.php. Over the years I have treated many patients with fibromyalgia. I find these cases challenging because, for the fibromyalgia patient, each day is different. When treatment is properly executed, patients find relief. This relief is without any unnecessary chemicals and without further injury to their body.

Acupuncture helps us regain the perfect balance our bodies need. There are internal factors as well as external factors ( environment). Patients living in Chicago may experience different symptoms versus patients living in a drier climates such as Arizona. Trained acupuncturist account for the external factors as well as the internal factors. The careful selection of prescription points promotes better results.

Inactivity and Heart Disease

February 19, 2015 - Leave a Response

Every minute counts when it comes to your health. According to the Journal of American Heart Association, each minute of physical activity may reduce your chance of developing a heart attack or heart related disease. (http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/289572.php)

What limits your ability to be active? Some have jobs which require them to be inactive for hours. Sitting staring at computer screens causes many individuals to adopt sedentary lifestyles. Some are hindered due to pain, illness and chronic fatigue. When every minute counts, we need to make decisions that will greatly impact our lives. You don’t need to be involved in moderate to high intensity workouts. Short low intensity activity can improve your health.

Avoid sitting excessive periods of time. Every half hour make yourself get up and move around. If pain is preventing you from moving, seek help. Many people are discovering the benefits of Chiropractic care. Chiropractic keeps people moving and healthy.

Keep moving and keep your heart happy.

To: Your Valentine. Please Bring Red Wine and Dark Chocolate

February 6, 2014 - Leave a Response

As Valentine’s day approaches don’t forget the red wine and dark chocolate. Red wine contains flavonoids which can improve your HDL (good cholesterol levels)levels. Dark chocolate, that has a cocoa content of greater than 70%, also contains flavonoids. Flavonoids are powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants protect our cells from damage. What better way of saying I love you!

Looking for the perfect I “heart” you dinner menu?

Red wine

Salad: spinach tossed with fresh berries and a little walnut oil

Main Course: Salmon or tuna with a side asparagus

Dessert: fresh raspberries with slivers of dark chocolate

Please see Top Heart-Healthy Foods: Best Food for Cardiovascular Health at www.webmd.com for additional heart healthy foods.

To: Your Valentine. Please Bring Red Wine and Dark Chocolate

February 6, 2014 - Leave a Response

As Valentine’s day approaches don’t forget the red wine and dark chocolate. Red wine contains flavonoids which can improve your HDL (good cholesterol levels)levels. Dark chocolate, that has a cocoa content of greater than 70%, also contains flavonoids. Flavonoids are powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants protect our cells from damage. What better way of saying I love you!

Looking for the perfect I “heart” you dinner menu?

Red wine

Salad: spinach tossed with fresh berries and a little walnut oil

Main Course: Salmon or tuna with a side asparagus

Dessert: fresh raspberries with slivers of dark chocolate

Please see Top Heart-Healthy Foods: Best Food for Cardiovascular Health at www.webmd.com for additional heart healthy foods.

Is Low Carb High Fat Diet the Right Choice?

January 27, 2014 - Leave a Response

Do we switch to high fat diets now? Not so fast! Let’s look at what we are eating. Does your diet contain a variety of fruit, vegetables and whole grains? Or are you eating highly processed foods? Fruits, vegetables and whole grains contain many nutrients our bodies require.  The quantity, consumed of these foods, is the problem. How much is too much? I’m all for a balanced diet. When we eat too much of one food group, trouble begins.

According to Dr. David Perlmutter lower carbohydrate diets are better for heart and immune systems. Wait a minute? Let’s take a moment to examine this. If your diet is too high in carbohydrates, the excess carbohydrates will get stored as fat. This will increase your risk for heart disease. A balanced diet with the inclusion of good fats is a better choice. The key word is good fats. Some examples of good fats are :

Plant oils:Hemp oil, olive oil, flax seed oil, canola oil, grape seed oil

Nuts and seeds

cold water fish: salmon, trout, tuna and mackerel

Remember a little goes a long way. Look at your portions